Images and voices of armed conflict

Louie Palu (Canadian, b. 1968). U.S. Marine Gysgt. Carlos "OJ" Orjuela, age 31, Garmsir District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan, from Project: Home Front, 2008. Inkjet print, artist's proof, 21½ x 14¼ in. (54.6 x 36.2 cm). The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, gift of Joan Morgenstern. © Photographer Louie Palu

Louie Palu (Canadian, b. 1968). U.S. Marine Gysgt. Carlos “OJ” Orjuela, age 31, Garmsir District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan, from Project: Home Front, 2008. Inkjet print, artist’s proof, 21½ x 14¼ in. (54.6 x 36.2 cm). The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, gift of Joan Morgenstern. © Photographer Louie Palu

WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath, the current exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, explores the experience of war through its collection of 400 photographic prints, books, magazines, albums, and camera equipment.  The show brings together iconic and unknown images taken by members of the military, commercial portraitists, journalists, amateurs, artists, and numerous Pulitzer Prize–winning photographers.

The objects on view include rare daguerreotypes and vintage photographs, such as Roger Fenton’s iconic The Valley of the Shadow of Death (1855) from the Crimean War and an early print of Joe Rosenthal’s Old Glory Goes Up on Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima. More recent images include a 2008 photograph of the Battle Company of the 173rd Airborne Brigade in eastern Afghanistan by Tim Hetherington.

Earlier this fall, StoryCorps partnered with the Brooklyn Museum to record the stories of veterans and photographers involved in the exhibition.  On November 14, StoryCorps will present select stories from those recording sessions as part of a talkback that will include StoryCorps staff as well as photographers, Ron Haviv and Nina Berman, and veterans Drew Pham, Williams Stein, and Helen Shor.

Check out the invitation below for more details.

MVI_closing_flyer

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One thought on “Images and voices of armed conflict

  1. Pingback: Military voices | The Recollective Blog

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